Tag Archives: Self-published fantasy blog-off

SPFBO ’18 Finalists: Where to Start With New Self-Published Fantasy

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So Self-published Fantasy Blog-Off 2018 wrapped up not too long ago, and I recently realized I never put a list together! Yes, I’ve been meaning to do this, but some personal stuff’s been eating away at my time as of late, and I’ve only now put together my summary of the finalists. There’s a lot of cool stuff to be found here though, and If you’re a new reader looking to dive into indie fantasy, these fresh new picks are a good way to get started!

For ease of browsing, I’ve separated all these into different genres. Links go to the books’ Amazon pages, and you can check out a list of the reviews and scores at Mark Lawrence’s blog. Speaking of Mark Larence, you can check out the quick interview I did with him if you’re curious about #SPFBO and how it came to be.

And with that out of the way, here’s our list of last year’s finalists!
EPIC/HIGH FANTASY

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We Ride the Storm by Devin MadsonGrim, Asian-inspired worlds of horseriders and swordslingers. There’s a preview up online that I read, and it reminds me a bit of the Dothraki bits from early Song of Fire and Ice. Devin Madson is again, no newbie when it comes to writing, and if you like Asian fantasy, she’s written other books with that theming.

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Symphony of the Wind by Steve McKinnonVast worldbuilding, multiple POVs and some light steampunk elements. If you’re looking for another deep, rich world to sink your teeth into, this novel’s worth a read!

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The Anointed by Keith Ward Some really interesting concepts here! Immortality, proxy-bodies, dragonriders and water that things cannot float on (meaning no boats — and probably no Pennywise either). This one seems to be almost a lost breed of epic fantasy, one which has almost sci-fi-esque concepts in worldbuilding.

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The Gods of Men by Barbra KlossEpic fantasy with bits of Romance, this book is highly lauded, and Kloss is already a proven author witha good track record in adult and YA lit. If you enjoy both those things, as well as fantasy in the Sanderson mold, this book’s for you.

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Aching God by Mike Shel Epic Fantasy from a Pathfinder narrative writer who went on to make his own series. Seems to have a paranormal bent, with haunted places and creepy tombs. The series seems to borrow a bit from hack-and-slash RPG sessions, and gamers will probably enjoy this one a lot.
YOUNG ADULT

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Ruthless Magic by Megan CreweFirst in a YA series about magicians living in our world. It’s described as essentially similar to the best of late Harry Potter, but with a darker edge. As someone who got fed up with the Chocolate Frogs and Whimsy-Dimsy in Harry Potter, this seems like it draws from the cooler bits. Dementors, Aurors, etc. If you like YA and Urban Fantasy, give this one a go.

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Sowing by Angie GrigaliunasDystopian YA in a secondary fantasy setting. A lot of YA takes place in our world, but I find I enjoy it more when you add a unique setting to the mix. This one I personally find really intriguing! There’s some real hype here for Angie’s world, and I’m curious to see what it’s all about. Supposedly has a Hunger Games feel, but with more fun fantasy worldbuilding elements.
URBAN FANTASY

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Sworn to the Night by Craig SchaeferUrban fantasy with other worlds, witches, NYPD officers and other bizarro elements that set it aside from the “Anita Blake Leather-Hunter” type stories. Urban fantasy is one of those things that I feel needs a really strong and unique hook to work. Something like Fables or I Was a Teenage Weredeer. If you like the weirder, dreamlike side of Urban Fantasy, give this one a go.

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Out of Nowhere by Patrick LeClerc Urban fantasy about an immortal “healer” who acts as a paramedic. Upon healing the wrong person, his life and the life of those he loves is put into jeopardy. The author himself is a paramedic, so the novel comes with a real sense of authenticity, kind of like a John Grisham law novel. Concept seems like Highlander meets Grey’s Anatomy, which is a huge deviation from regular Urban Fantasy. Probably the biggest curveball in this entire group.
OTHER

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Orconomics by J. Zachary PikeBiting social satire meets RPG tropes. If you enjoy the Discworld series, give this series a read. There aren’t enough comedic western fantasy novels of this sort out there, but Pike seems to be making a name for himself quite rapidly in that space.

THOUGHTS: Epic/High Fantasy is a genre that continues to get a lot of love in the self-pub space. To the point where even a lot of trad Epic Fantasy has its roots in indie (Licanus, Books of Babel, et cetera). What’s really cool though is the emergence of stuff like We Ride the Storm, which is a far cry from the medieval European settings of many books. Also, much like Andrew Rowe before him, we see a former writer from the gaming space (Keith Ward) going the indie route to tell his own story.

YA also had a really strong showing this year, with some titles that seemingly learned a lot from the big names (Harry Potter, Mortal Bones, Hunger Games, etc) but go in interesting and unique directions. Sowing in particular is something I’ve heard nothing but rave reviews for. I’ve even heard some folks claim it’s the next Throne of Glass, which is high praise coming from the YA crowd.

Lastly, we got some really strange but cool additions in Urban Fantasy and “Other”. Orconomics has sort of a “Discworldy” feel to it, which is quite unique in a field awash with lots of Epic and Urban stuff. And speaking of the latter, our two Urban entries are strikingly unique and a far cry from the Anita Blakes and Twilights of the genre. All in all, another really exciting year!

PERSONAL PICKS: YA isn’t really my thing, but Sowing has me intrigued. Among the Epic Fantasy books, We Ride the Storm and Aching God look the most intriguing. And while it wasn’t a finalist, D.P. Prior’s Carnifex has me intrigued. I like dwarves, especially the berserk, Warhammer Fantasy-style dwarves, so that has me intrigued. Plus, the title is bad-ass.

Also, while I’m focusing on the finalists, there’s a lot of really good books that made it to second or third place in the contest. Michael R. Baker’s The Thousand Scars gets brought up a lot by fans of grimdark, and I have that one on Kindle on my TBR list. While it didn’t make it to the finals, it does have a lot of fans, and there’s a few more books that are similarly liked that didn’t make the finalist place. If you know of any, feel free to comment below and share your thoughts!

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#SPFBO Interview: Mark Lawrence, Author of Prince of Thorns

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Mark Lawrence. If you’re familiar with the “grimdark” subgenre of fantasy, you’re probably well aware of his work, most notably the international bestseller Prince of Thorns. He’s up there with some of the best and most well-known fantasy authors out there. However, as I got into the indie fantasy scene, I noticed him being brought up with even more frequency.

As it turns out, Mark doesn’t just work in the trad publishing space, but also hosts the Self-Published Fantasy Blog-Off, a contest for indie genre authors. Having covered the SPFBO a bit in prior posts, I was curious to see what inspired Mark to start it, as well as his thoughts on other related topics.

MARTIN: So for those who are new to all this, what exactly is SPFBO?

MARK: The Self-Published Fantasy Blog-Off is a contest that exists to shine a light on self-published fantasy. Ten blogs judge 300 books each year to find ten finalists and one winner. It exists to find excellent books that might otherwise have gone unnoticed. It aims to help readers select, from the enormous range of options, books that have a better chance of entertaining them than a random choice, thereby increasing reader faith in finding a quality self-published read.

MARTIN: As most fantasy readers are no doubt aware, you’re traditionally-published, and an international bestseller. So what got you into the indie scene?

MARK: I think it arose through a combination of survivor’s guilt and the fact that I enjoy competitions. I always felt traditional publishing to be a lottery and, when I got a “big” book deal, I never believed it to be because I was somehow head and shoulders better than all the others striving to be in the same place. I encountered a number of self-published authors after being published myself and, before being published I interacted with many unpublished writers on critique forums, so I knew that the reservoir of top class talent out there was huge. I also saw how hard it is for a book, regardless of quality, to somehow show itself above the noise barrier when so many titles are competing for attention. A brilliant book can fail utterly, but that same book, with even a modest publicity push can take off.

The SPFBO was just a small way of offering an extra chance, a way to find great books irrespective of the author’s personal marketing skills and to bring them to a wider audience. It’s also a method to filter some excellence from the sea of self-published offerings so that readers could feel more confidence when committing to them – which then steps toward giving self-published titles in general a better reputation and helps all of them engage new readers.

MARTIN:  So onto your books! You latest novel, Grey Sister, came out this April. For those of us who are new to your books, can you give us a quick pitch of the series?

MARK: Gay murder nuns. You said quick.

MARTIN: Short and to the point. I like it! But now, on to the books you’re a fan of. Are there any indie titles in particular you’d recommend to self-pub fantasy newbs, SPFBO or otherwise?

MARK: I’m a slow reader with limited spare time so I’ve really not read many self-published fantasy books, and almost all of those are SPFBO finalists. My big favourite is Senlin Ascends (now traditionally published). The three winners so far all have much to recommend them. The Grey Bastards (also now traditionally published) is excellent.

MARTIN: What advice would you give any readers here who might be considering a SPFBO submission of their own next year?

MARK: I don’t think any advice other than “do it” is required. Otherwise it’s the same things you would do if you weren’t entering. Write a great book.

MARTIN: And for our last question…you’re well-known for fantasy books classified as “Grimdark.” As many SFF and gaming fans know, the term had its origins in the Warhammer 40,000 franchise. So I’m curious…do you have a favorite Space Marine Chapter?

MARK: I’ve never read a Warhammer book and know nothing about them. Though, oddly, I was invited to write for them recently.

Mark Lawrence’s next book, Holy Sister, arrives March of next year, and is available for pre-order. You can also check out his Amazon Page to get caught up on his prior work, or his blog for updates on SPFBO and other topics. Also, please consider liking and sharing this post on social media. Every share helps me get the word out about writing, authors and other topics related to genre writing!

The Tide is Turning in Indie SFF Publishing, #SPFBO

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When I first posted my Self-Published Fantasy Guide, I had no idea just how far self-published and indie SFF lit has come. I still remember a time when “self-published” was synonymous with horrible paranormal romance books and…stranger things.

As of 2018 however, we’re seeing some major authors and titles emerging from the self-published and indie scene. Books with stories and covers comparable to (or better than) traditional offerings. This trend has increased to the point where the Barnes and Noble Sci-Fi and Fantasy Blog revealed the cover art for Rob J. Hayes’ Never Die.

Yes, this is real. The genre promotion blog of America’s biggest book chain just featured a self-published book. I remember talking to a fairly well-known author who’ll remain anonymous, and having him mention that “indie is the future.” That was not even a year ago, and as far as I can tell, we’re reaching that future at a shockingly rapid pace.

So yeah. The tide has definitely turned, and indie is getting bigger and bigger. I was told by the author Rob J. Hayes that some folks “took notice” of his SPFBO win, which goes to show what a useful tool that is for curating these titles. Which is something to keep in mind if any of you are planning books of your own.

If you haven’t bought any of his books yet, you can check out Rob J. Hayes’ Amazon page here. I recommend his piratical Best Laid Plans books, as they’re fairly unique in the fantasy space. Which is a trend Never Die seems to continue with its chanbara influences. It’s a book I think looks really kickass, and I’m glad Barnes and Noble seems to think so too!

The Spooktober Report! #SPFO, Writing, and more Author Interviews

October is probably one of my favorite months of the year, period. While I love the heck out of Halloween, it’s the whole cozy feeling of Fall that really makes me fall in love (no pun intended) with this time of year. October’s been a busy year for my writing as well however, and so I figured I’d post a quick update of some of what I’ve been up to…

As of now, I’m gearing up to write my book’s second draft. I’m working on a very, very detailed outline, as well as supplementary worldbuilding notes, which I suspect will occupy me well into next November. Draft 2 proper will likely carry me over into 2019, and will be ready sometime around summer or fall of that year, including edits and formatting and all that junk. Sometime in December-January-ish, I may be sharing some concept art for my book, as well as giving you all a sneak peek at just what in the heck it is. I can’t say too much at this point, though I will say I’ve been watching more than a few videos from the Townsends Youtube channel.

Author interviews are something I plan to invest a good amount of time in, and you can check out my most recent one here. The Self-Published Fantasy Blog-Off is getting closer to declaring finalists, and when it does, I’ll be reaching out to them, as well as a few of the semi-finalists. Michael R. Baker, author of the Thousand Scars, is also doing many SPFBO interviews, and I strongly recommend you check those out! There’s also a possibility I may be interviewing a Special Guest related to the contest, so keep your eyes peeled for that as well!

Aside from that, I am continuing to work on some writing stuff in the game development space, and may be able to share some of what I’m doing sometime next year. When that happens, I’m hoping to begin writing about game narratives, and how to get started writing lore for video and tabletop gaming IPs. It’s a subject I’m really passionate about, and something I hope to share with you all very soon.

Anyways, that’s about it! Hope your October is festive and as full of tricks and treats as mine is!