Tag Archives: japan

Rising of the Shield Hero Watch-Through Episode 3: “Wave of Catastrophe”

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So here we are, three episodes in. These summaries are pretty meaty, but folks seem to enjoy them, and the show’s given me quite a bit to cover in these posts. For those who are new to these breakdowns, I’m covering each episode of “Rising of the Shield Hero” and explaining how western SFF writers and readers can learn from Japanese “Light Novels”. If you’re not a writer, and simply want my thoughts on the show, then gain, feel free to skip the last bit. Also, you can read episode summary one and two with the links.

If you want to check out the story, you can buy the novel on Amazonor watch it for free on Crunchyroll. So without further ado, let’s dig into the summary! Also, spoiler warning.

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Rising of the Shield Hero Watch-Through Episode 1: “The Shield Hero”

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Japanese “Light Novels” are something I’ve been wanting to cover on this blog for quite some time. Essentially a cross between pulp fiction and YA, they’ve grown hugely popular in the last few years, and are starting to affect the western book market, especially in fantasy. Like LitRPGS? You can thank Sword Art Online and Log Horizon for that. Like Sufficiently Advanced Magic?

Recently, a show based on one of these Light Novels popped up, and has garnered both praise and controversy. Like the LN Goblin Slayer before it’s become very popular very rapidly due to some of the initial backlash it’s received. And since it’s somewhat topical at the moment, I’ve decided to dive into Shield Hero to dissect both the good and bad of Light Novels, and what western writers can learn (and avoid) from them. After watching a couple episodes, I feel Shield Hero is one of the best series for dissecting the tropes and elements of Light Novels, and what western authors can gain from them.

If you want to read the book, you can get it on Amazon here. If like me, you plan on watching the show, you can do so legally on Crunchyroll. There are massive spoilers ahead, so unless you’re okay with that, I recommend you check out the source material first (Crunchyroll is free but ad-supported).

For the sake of my more book-focused audience, I’ll be staying away from any terms or anime-specific wording, and will treat this as if I were discussing a western fantasy book or story. The one exception to this rule is the term “Isekai,” a LN genre where characters from Earth get transported to another (usually fantasy) world, often after dying and being reincarnated. The Chronicles of Narnia and Thomas Covenant series are kind of similar, but Isekai has its own tropes, such as the earth-heroes being reincarnated, or the world looking less like Middle-Earth and more like Dragon Quest.

Anyway, with that out of the way, let’s get on to the episode’s summary.

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